A lost Maxis “Sim” game has been discovered by an Ars reader, uploaded for all

SimRefinery has gone from a seemingly lost legend to a playable, downloadable video game. (That’s its real, full-resolution opening screen, as captured using a DOSBox emulator.) And it’s all thanks to an Ars Technica commenter.”>

Wow. It may only be an incomplete prototype, but in a breathtaking span of time, SimRefinery has gone from a seemingly lost legend to a playable, downloadable video game. (That’s its real, full-resolution opening screen, as captured using a DOSBox emulator.) And it’s all thanks to an Ars Technica commenter. (credit: archive.org / Maxis / Chevron)

We at Ars Technica are proud to be members of video game archiving history today. SimRefinery, one of PC gaming’s most notoriously “lost” video games, now exists—as a fully playable game, albeit an unfinished one—thanks to an Ars Technica reader commenting on the story of its legend.

Two weeks ago, I reported on a story about Maxis Business Solutions, a subdivision of the game developer Maxis created in the wake of SimCity’s booming success. Librarian and archivist Phil Salvador published an epic, interview-filled history of one of the game industry’s earliest examples of a “serious” gaming division, which was formed as a way to cash in on major businesses’ interest in using video games as work-training simulators.

As Salvador wrote in May:

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